MRI
Social Processes Initiative in Neurobiology of the Schizophrenia(s) Traveling Human Phantoms

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Social Processes Initiative in Neurobiology of the Schizophrenia(s) Traveling Human Phantoms
Social Processes Initiative in Neurobiology of the Schizophrenia(s) Traveling Human Phantoms
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  •   dataset_description.json
  •   participants.json
  •   participants.tsv
  •   README
  •   task-rest_bold.json
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README

Introduction

Human neuroimaging has led to an overwhelming amount of research into brain function in healthy and clinical populations. However, a better appreciation of the limitations of small sample studies has led to an increased number of multi-site, multi-scanner protocols to understand human brain function. As part of a multi-site project examining social cognition in schizophrenia, a group of "travelling human phantoms" had T1-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and resting-state functional MRI scans obtained. This data can be used to evaluate differences across scanners, consistency of pipeline outputs, or test multi-scanner harmonization approaches.

Methods

MRI scans were collected annually across three participating sites, starting in 2014 and ending in 2018. Scan protocols were carefully harmonized across sites prior to the study.

The three study sites include: - Center for Addiction and Mental Health, affiliated with the University of Toronto - Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, affiliated with the University of Maryland School of Medicine - Zucker Hillside Hospital, affiliated with the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell

Due to scanner upgrades at each site, Siemens Prisma MRI scanners were made available part way through the study.

Each MR session is distinguished by the study year acquired (i.e. Y1 denoting the first year of the study) and a three-letter identifier of the MRI scanner.

The original MRI scanner at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health was a General Electric 750w Discovery 3T, referred to as CMH; a Siemens Prisma (referred to as CMP) was made available in Y4 at the Toronto Neuroimaging Facility (ToNI) of the University of Toronto, Department of Psychology.

The original MRI scanner at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center was a Siemens Tim Trio 3T (referred to as MRC); they later upgraded to a Siemens Prisma (referred to as MRP) for Y3.

Zucker Hillside had a General Electric 750 Signa 3T (refer to a ZHH) at study start and upgraded to a Siemens Prisma (referred to as ZHP) for Y3.

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